Tuesday, 9 May 2017

Sinchie 1

Great Western Embroiderers, the group I stitch with, generally has a group project on the go in which I try to participate. So, from time to time, I find myself producing work which is very different both in technique and in focus from the main work I'm doing at the time.

Now is one of those times.


The choice was made by the group to produce a series of Sinchies (the stitched version, not the Aussie food pouches for children!), one every two months. My offering for this first round today (yet to be finished off, I admit) is shown above. The plan is that these will eventually be joined together in strips to make a larger whole.

Two months ago, two colours were drawn out of a hat and we were asked to produce a small piece 6 ins by 6 ins (hence the name) in whatever style took our fancy. This time the random colours were pink and green and to start us off, we were provided with a small pack of fabric, threads and beads in these colours to use and to which we could add from our own stash.

I added among other things strips of silk sari fabric, together with spun sari offcuts and fibres. I chose to put all these fabrics under the embellisher (needle felting machine) and then to hand stitch over the top. Inevitably, the piece ended up as a landscape as such impromptu pieces generally do. It is my default response when I haven't done any preliminary sketchbook work.

This sort of exercise tends to take me strangely out of my comfort zone as it is usually so different from what I am doing at the time, but it's good for me to think about other things and to work in a different way - to a formula and within boundaries, rather than freely and to my own agenda.

Right now, this formula inevitably involves the use of colour ... so definitely different and therefore probably most beneficial!


8 comments:

  1. A very pretty piece, reminds me of the sea of heather you see on the moors sometimes. I think being taken out of your comfort zone is a good thing as long as it isn't for to long.

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    1. Thank you very much, Debbie. As a regular visitor to Scotland, I can certainly see what you mean about moors and heather, though the Aberdeenshire hills when we visit are rarely quite this pink!

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  2. A wonderful exercise ! And with very pretty results !
    We all need to do this from time to time lest we forget where are roots are ;)

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    1. You're so right about remembering where our roots are. I started this little piece with something of a heavy heart as it's definitely not current focus for me, but as time passed, I really began to enjoy myself. There is something very soothing about repetitive stitching - and for me also about working with landscape.

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  3. Taking on a piece with set colors is a challenge that had to be a test in the ability to play. A nice break and as you said a spirit lifter!

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    1. Yes, generally I avoid too much prescription but this had to be done and proved to be a pleasure!

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  4. Thanks for the kind words, Margaret. I hope in some later post you'll post your colored trees for you readers. I'm in love with your red/gold/olive version.

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    1. How kind of your to reply. You must be so busy! I will indeed post some more of my work from the course, including the red/gold/olive trees. I've had my head so deep into all the lessons that I've had no time to think of much else, let alone post to my blog! It's all so useful and there is so much to absorb and try out. Thank you!

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